1 COMMENT

  1. I’m afraid I have to agree with Ms Holt, the centre of St Andrews is a ghetto of students with no manners particularly when walking on the pavement (they never give way to the elderly forcing them off the pavement). The absent landlords receiving high rents for the flats above the shops while leaving the fabric of the building to deteriorate, gutters overflowing onto the public below, this was never the case 30+ years ago. Most of the milleniums or Generation Ys of St Andrews are either living in the surrounding districts or have left St Andrews altogether resulting in a grossly unproportionate society of elderly and 20 year olds.
    Purchasing the Guardbridge papermill could have resolved the crisis by building student accommodation onsite, however I understand that office workers are to be moved to Guardbridge to make way for even greater numbers of student teaching facilities and students in St Andrews which will only compound the housing crisis.
    I have lived in St Andrews for 65 years and although change is expected and the student and visitors were welcomed by the residents of the town I’m afraid the welcome ended long ago. The town has been taken over by opportunists making money out the heritage of St Andrews built up over the years between the residents and university, this was destroyed many years ago particularly since Prince William’s university years.
    The town now has three clear designated centres, North St, South St and Market St the student’s ghetto during the university term turning into a visitor’s centre during the holiday season, the residents/students quarters in and around Morrisons supermarket and the area adjoining the Links golf courses which is overcrowded with tour operators and visiting golfers (many properties being bought by American consortiums and occupied for a month or two a year). Unfortunately, the residents’ quality and cost of living has been compromised over the years by an overabundance of transients who are here today gone tomorrow and not paying community taxes, many of whom leave the environment in a worse state than when they arrived. Fife Council and the university have ignored this time bomb which is now being realised.
    This is an issue both the university and councillors should endeavour to investigate in reducing or stabilising the numbers visiting St Andrews in an attempt to harmonise both groups with the residents. The variety of committees and trusts within the town are infiltrated by individuals who tend to have an agenda to better themselves the outcome of which is the conundrum we have today – the bigger the numbers the bigger the rewards in both the social and financial ladders. The answer lies in reducing or stabilising the numbers however who is prepared to compromise – to date its only been the resident.

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