Former student employees celebrate their graduation with a sweet treat.  Photo: Jannettas
Former student employees celebrate their graduation with a sweet treat.
Photo: Jannettas

During the academic year, most of us students feel like we have enough on our plates. Between coursework, societies and sports teams, we always have one thing after another that needs to get done. Despite this, some students choose to take on an additional responsibility — namely, a part-time job.

Students work a variety of part-time jobs in St Andrews. Some are employed by the University, occupying roles from assistant hall wardens to research assistants in various Schools.

Many others, however, find work with employers throughout town. According to Linda Nicolson, who works at the Careers Centre, this can range from small tasks such as gardening or fixing IT problems to jobs at shops, restaurants and global hotel chains in St Andrews.

But this extra obligation may not feel like an obligation at all for some. Anne Marie Holt, who worked at Jannettas Gelateria for a year until her graduation this past June, said: “Working as a student is good not just for the income […] It is a time that is officially dedicated to not feeling guilty for avoiding assignments and is instead dedicated to something completely different than uni work.”

“Students have always worked at Jannettas since it was founded back in 1908,” said Owen Hazel, who owns the ice cream shop with his wife Nicola. “Indeed, students and our workforce that we would not be the success that we are without them.”

At the moment, 40 out of their 73 staff members are St Andrews students. “One challenge is that we have to try and work around students’ timetables to cover the fluctuations and holidays so, as a result, we employ a lot of students to accommodate different shift patterns,” said Owen.

Louise Cameron, a 2015 graduate who has worked at Jannettas since her first year, was grateful for the Hazels’ efforts, especially in her final year. “They understand things like study leave and were happy to give me time off during the month before my dissertation hand in,” she said.

For those looking for work, a major resource for St Andrews students is the Careers Centre’s Job Shop. Here, local employers can advertise part-time jobs geared to students. Linda, who manages the Job Shop, said: “I have found that the Job Shop is a very popular service both enjoyed by students and local employers. In fact many employers return to us year after year to employ students.”

According to Linda, over 200 local businesses use the Job Shop to post job listings, with between 350 and 400 individual listings posted in a single academic year.

While the Job Shop is a useful tool – with so many businesses posting their vacancies in one place – it  is not the only way to find a part-time job in the Bubble. Job openings can also be found at Jobcentre Plus on South Street, in the local papers, on signs in shop windows, by word of mouth or simply by sending out speculative CVs.

Many St Andrews students are particularly employable due to their ability to speak different languages, thanks to the diverse student population and the high number of students studying foreign languages. “Our customer base is not only local and national, but also international so having a wide range of student employees who speak so many different languages is a fantastic asset to us,” said Owen.

By working at local businesses, student employees help bridge the gap between the students and the locals of St Andrews. Those with jobs in town get the opportunity to interact with its inhabitants in a way most students do not.

“Through working, I’ve felt a lot more integrated in the local community. Many customers are curious about student life, and will ask questions,” said Louise. “Jannettas also has a very good relationship with the student community, and I think that employing students strengthens that.”

For students looking for a part-timejob, the Job Shop can be found here.

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